Two people smiling one with a loan form looking at a laptop

Before you start your online loan order, you need to gather information from your teachers about the type of books they want you to order. This is especially important for whole-school loans.

This page explains how to go about gathering the information you need to order a loan from us.

  • Firstly, make sure that teachers understand the lending process.
  • Next, find out what books they would like to support their students' learning.
  • Then structure your loan requests to get the most out of your loan allocation.
  • Make sure teachers understand the lending process

    One of your important roles as your school's loan coordinator is to explain the lending service to teachers.

    Teachers need to know:

    • how the service works — download and share the Whole-school lending diagram to help explain this
    • what information to give you — our Whole-school loan requirements and Specific title requirements forms can help you collate this
    • the deadline for getting their requirements to you.

    Whole-school lending process diagram (pdf, 173KB)

    Whole-school loan requirements form (docx, 123KB)

    Specific title requirements form (docx, 121KB)

    Set up a timeline and time(s) to meet

    It’s helpful to set up a timeline for working through the lending process so that everyone knows what needs to happen and when.

    Find out about the planning cycle in your school to see how this will work with Services to Schools’ loan request periods.

    Dates for ordering and returning school loans

    Arrange time with teachers to talk about the service before or during their planning meetings.

  • Make sure teachers understand the lending process

    One of your important roles as your school's loan coordinator is to explain the lending service to teachers.

    Teachers need to know:

    • how the service works — download and share the Whole-school lending diagram to help explain this
    • what information to give you — our Whole-school loan requirements and Specific title requirements forms can help you collate this
    • the deadline for getting their requirements to you.

    Whole-school lending process diagram (pdf, 173KB)

    Whole-school loan requirements form (docx, 123KB)

    Specific title requirements form (docx, 121KB)

    Set up a timeline and time(s) to meet

    It’s helpful to set up a timeline for working through the lending process so that everyone knows what needs to happen and when.

    Find out about the planning cycle in your school to see how this will work with Services to Schools’ loan request periods.

    Dates for ordering and returning school loans

    Arrange time with teachers to talk about the service before or during their planning meetings.

  • Ask teachers what they want

    In a small school, all staff may meet to plan the inquiry topics and literacy focus for the coming term. In this case, the whole staff can decide together what resources they need.

    In a larger school, the planning and decision making may happen in teaching teams, syndicates, or department groups. In this case, ask someone from each group to feedback to you after their meetings. Ask your school's literacy leader or English department staff about what resources they need to support and engage students in reading.

    Use our forms to gather details for your online order

    Our forms can help you collect all the information you need to order your books online. Adapt them to suit your needs, or create your own (e.g. set up and share a Google form) to gather teachers’ requirements.

    Whole-school loans

    When you order a whole-school loan online, you make a number of requests. These requests tell our librarians what sorts of books your school needs. The number of requests you can make depends on the size of your school.

    To complete the online form, you'll need to know for each request:

    • the curriculum learning area and strand you want resources for
    • the focus for the request — there's space for 200 characters, so you'll need to be clear and concise
    • the reading age you need resources for
    • the year levels you need resources for
    • the number of students each request will support.

    Whole-school loan requirements form (docx, 123KB) will help you gather teachers' requirements. There are examples of requests on the reverse of the form.

    Requesting specific books — anytime title requests

    To request a specific book, you'll need to know its:

    • author
    • title, or
    • ISBN.

    Request a specific book — anytime title requests

    Specific title requirement form (docx, 121KB)

  • Ask teachers what they want

    In a small school, all staff may meet to plan the inquiry topics and literacy focus for the coming term. In this case, the whole staff can decide together what resources they need.

    In a larger school, the planning and decision making may happen in teaching teams, syndicates, or department groups. In this case, ask someone from each group to feedback to you after their meetings. Ask your school's literacy leader or English department staff about what resources they need to support and engage students in reading.

    Use our forms to gather details for your online order

    Our forms can help you collect all the information you need to order your books online. Adapt them to suit your needs, or create your own (e.g. set up and share a Google form) to gather teachers’ requirements.

    Whole-school loans

    When you order a whole-school loan online, you make a number of requests. These requests tell our librarians what sorts of books your school needs. The number of requests you can make depends on the size of your school.

    To complete the online form, you'll need to know for each request:

    • the curriculum learning area and strand you want resources for
    • the focus for the request — there's space for 200 characters, so you'll need to be clear and concise
    • the reading age you need resources for
    • the year levels you need resources for
    • the number of students each request will support.

    Whole-school loan requirements form (docx, 123KB) will help you gather teachers' requirements. There are examples of requests on the reverse of the form.

    Requesting specific books — anytime title requests

    To request a specific book, you'll need to know its:

    • author
    • title, or
    • ISBN.

    Request a specific book — anytime title requests

    Specific title requirement form (docx, 121KB)

  • Review requests to make the best use of your whole-school allocation

    When you get the requirement forms back from teachers, check to see whether they make good use of the topic requests your school can make. To maximise the number of books you'll receive (within your school's allocation), you'll need to use all available requests.

    If you want to change the topic requests listed on the forms, have these confirmed by teachers before you go ahead and order your loan.

    Who can borrow, what you can borrow explains the number of books and resources your school can borrow.

    Deciding between whole-school loan or anytime title requests

    Advice for primary and intermediate schools

    Here are some examples of when you might need to use a specific title request rather than adding another request to a whole-school resource loan order.

    • Students initiate an inquiry or project after your whole-school loan order has been submitted.
    • A teacher asks for a particular book or a few titles they want to evaluate as class texts.
    • The teacher who coordinates your school's gifted and talented initiatives asks for specific resources they'd like to support a small group's special abilities, or highly focused interests.
    • An unexpected or local event spurs an interest in a topic after your whole-school loan order has been submitted.

    If you're not sure about whether to make an anytime title request, ask our facilitators to help you decide the best option for your learners.

    Get help with our lending service

    Advice for secondary and composite schools

    If teachers have already planned and prepared a course outline or schedule for each subject area, use these to help build your whole-school resource loan. This is particularly useful when you're supporting a topic with a large cohort of learners.

    It may be better — and more timely — to use anytime title requests to support:

    • a particular NCEA assessment
    • a class with few students, or
    • students with a unique learning focus.

    We also have great digital resources available, including our Topic Explorer service, which we encourage you to include in your resource planning.

    Digital resources and guides

    What if I have too many requests?

    If your teachers' requirements outnumber the maximum topic requests you can make, try doing the following:

    • Group related requirements together into a single request. Combine teachers' needs into the learning focus field.
    • Replace a broad reading engagement request with a reading engagement top-up (up to 75 books). This could free up a topic request which you can use for inquiry. You can’t specify a focus for a reading engagement top-up, but the books will include fiction and high-interest non-fiction titles matched to your school’s profile.
    • Look at using an anytime title request as an alternative, for example, to support a small number of students or a specific curriculum Achievement Standard. You can make as many of these requests as you need.
    • Use our Topic Explorer and other digital resources to find more content to inspire and inform inquiry.

    Request a specific book — anytime title requests

    What if I end up with fewer requests than my school's allocation?

    Here are some ways to make the most of our service and get more books:

    • Extend your order by adding new requests with different learning areas and strands, year levels, or reading ages that make each request more specific. Or add a cross-curricular strand to access a wider selection of books.
    • Add a reading engagement request to supplement your school's library collection. In this case, you might use a general learning focus such as 'Books to encourage reading for pleasure'.

    Example showing how to maximise your school's allocation

    This example shows a school with a roll size of 40 students, and a maximum of 4 topic requests each term. They are planning a school-wide inquiry relating to habitats. Using all 4 topic requests (rather than 1 broad school-wide request) means the school can:

    • potentially access more books, by splitting 1 large inquiry focus into several more specific topics
    • better target their support for particular year levels or reading ages.

    School-wide inquiry plan

    Curriculum area and strand Science: Living world
    Inquiry focus Habitats: rainforests, oceans, rocky-shore, jungles, plains, insects, birds, fish, farming, whales, endangered species.
    Reading ages 5–14
    Year levels 1–8

    Possible topic requests for this school-wide inquiry

    Topic request number Learning area & strand Learning focus Year level(s) Number of students Reading age (from—to)
    1 Science — Living world Habitats: rainforests, oceans, rocky-shore, jungles, plains 1–2 8 5–7
    2 Science — Living world Animals: including insects, birds, fish, whales 3–4 9 7–9
    3 Technology — Nature of technology Changes in technology and the impact on farming e.g. tractors, milking machines 5–6 12 9–12
    4 Cross-curricular — Science Endangered species — looking for all curriculum areas, English, art, science, social sciences etc. 7–8 11 10–14
  • Review requests to make the best use of your whole-school allocation

    When you get the requirement forms back from teachers, check to see whether they make good use of the topic requests your school can make. To maximise the number of books you'll receive (within your school's allocation), you'll need to use all available requests.

    If you want to change the topic requests listed on the forms, have these confirmed by teachers before you go ahead and order your loan.

    Who can borrow, what you can borrow explains the number of books and resources your school can borrow.

    Deciding between whole-school loan or anytime title requests

    Advice for primary and intermediate schools

    Here are some examples of when you might need to use a specific title request rather than adding another request to a whole-school resource loan order.

    • Students initiate an inquiry or project after your whole-school loan order has been submitted.
    • A teacher asks for a particular book or a few titles they want to evaluate as class texts.
    • The teacher who coordinates your school's gifted and talented initiatives asks for specific resources they'd like to support a small group's special abilities, or highly focused interests.
    • An unexpected or local event spurs an interest in a topic after your whole-school loan order has been submitted.

    If you're not sure about whether to make an anytime title request, ask our facilitators to help you decide the best option for your learners.

    Get help with our lending service

    Advice for secondary and composite schools

    If teachers have already planned and prepared a course outline or schedule for each subject area, use these to help build your whole-school resource loan. This is particularly useful when you're supporting a topic with a large cohort of learners.

    It may be better — and more timely — to use anytime title requests to support:

    • a particular NCEA assessment
    • a class with few students, or
    • students with a unique learning focus.

    We also have great digital resources available, including our Topic Explorer service, which we encourage you to include in your resource planning.

    Digital resources and guides

    What if I have too many requests?

    If your teachers' requirements outnumber the maximum topic requests you can make, try doing the following:

    • Group related requirements together into a single request. Combine teachers' needs into the learning focus field.
    • Replace a broad reading engagement request with a reading engagement top-up (up to 75 books). This could free up a topic request which you can use for inquiry. You can’t specify a focus for a reading engagement top-up, but the books will include fiction and high-interest non-fiction titles matched to your school’s profile.
    • Look at using an anytime title request as an alternative, for example, to support a small number of students or a specific curriculum Achievement Standard. You can make as many of these requests as you need.
    • Use our Topic Explorer and other digital resources to find more content to inspire and inform inquiry.

    Request a specific book — anytime title requests

    What if I end up with fewer requests than my school's allocation?

    Here are some ways to make the most of our service and get more books:

    • Extend your order by adding new requests with different learning areas and strands, year levels, or reading ages that make each request more specific. Or add a cross-curricular strand to access a wider selection of books.
    • Add a reading engagement request to supplement your school's library collection. In this case, you might use a general learning focus such as 'Books to encourage reading for pleasure'.

    Example showing how to maximise your school's allocation

    This example shows a school with a roll size of 40 students, and a maximum of 4 topic requests each term. They are planning a school-wide inquiry relating to habitats. Using all 4 topic requests (rather than 1 broad school-wide request) means the school can:

    • potentially access more books, by splitting 1 large inquiry focus into several more specific topics
    • better target their support for particular year levels or reading ages.

    School-wide inquiry plan

    Curriculum area and strand Science: Living world
    Inquiry focus Habitats: rainforests, oceans, rocky-shore, jungles, plains, insects, birds, fish, farming, whales, endangered species.
    Reading ages 5–14
    Year levels 1–8

    Possible topic requests for this school-wide inquiry

    Topic request number Learning area & strand Learning focus Year level(s) Number of students Reading age (from—to)
    1 Science — Living world Habitats: rainforests, oceans, rocky-shore, jungles, plains 1–2 8 5–7
    2 Science — Living world Animals: including insects, birds, fish, whales 3–4 9 7–9
    3 Technology — Nature of technology Changes in technology and the impact on farming e.g. tractors, milking machines 5–6 12 9–12
    4 Cross-curricular — Science Endangered species — looking for all curriculum areas, English, art, science, social sciences etc. 7–8 11 10–14
  • Availability of resources

    We process loans in the order we receive them. Your loan comes from books on our shelves. Sometimes books may not be available because:

    • a topic is in high demand — e.g. Anzac Day, Waitangi Day
    • there are few resources published on the subject — e.g. Pacific Islands
    • there's nothing published for a particular year level — e.g. French Revolution for year 1.

    If we can't send you resources for a topic, try using Topic Explorer or our other online digital resources.

    Digital resources and guides

  • Availability of resources

    We process loans in the order we receive them. Your loan comes from books on our shelves. Sometimes books may not be available because:

    • a topic is in high demand — e.g. Anzac Day, Waitangi Day
    • there are few resources published on the subject — e.g. Pacific Islands
    • there's nothing published for a particular year level — e.g. French Revolution for year 1.

    If we can't send you resources for a topic, try using Topic Explorer or our other online digital resources.

    Digital resources and guides

  • Need help?

    FAQs about school lending

    Or phone or email us:

  • Need help?

    FAQs about school lending

    Or phone or email us: