Whether you use, re-use, share or create content it is subject to copyright. Librarians, teachers and students need to know how to get permission to use copyright materials and acknowledge other people's work.

  • Copyright — what it is

    Copyright means the creator of a work — artist, composer, director, illustrator, performer, photographer, producer or writer — has the exclusive right to:

    • make and distribute copies
    • create derivative works, for example mash-ups or arrangements
    • publicly perform or display their work.

    Copyright acknowledges the rights of the creator in relation to their intellectual property and sets out the rights of others to access or use someone else’s work.

    Copyright in schools — general information from TKI about copyright and licensing for New Zealand schools.

    What copyright materials are

    The majority of materials used in schools have copyright conditions attached to them. This includes physical resources such as books, music, films, TV and radio broadcasts, and all kinds of digital content, including websites.

    Using content from the internet

    Copyright doesn't just apply to physical items — material on the internet is also subject to copyright. Web content is automatically copyrighted unless it explicitly says otherwise — it doesn't have to have a copyright statement.

    If you're re-using material from a site that allows re-use, that may only apply to the text — the images or other content may not have re-use conditions.

  • Copyright — what it is

    Copyright means the creator of a work — artist, composer, director, illustrator, performer, photographer, producer or writer — has the exclusive right to:

    • make and distribute copies
    • create derivative works, for example mash-ups or arrangements
    • publicly perform or display their work.

    Copyright acknowledges the rights of the creator in relation to their intellectual property and sets out the rights of others to access or use someone else’s work.

    Copyright in schools — general information from TKI about copyright and licensing for New Zealand schools.

    What copyright materials are

    The majority of materials used in schools have copyright conditions attached to them. This includes physical resources such as books, music, films, TV and radio broadcasts, and all kinds of digital content, including websites.

    Using content from the internet

    Copyright doesn't just apply to physical items — material on the internet is also subject to copyright. Web content is automatically copyrighted unless it explicitly says otherwise — it doesn't have to have a copyright statement.

    If you're re-using material from a site that allows re-use, that may only apply to the text — the images or other content may not have re-use conditions.

  • Guidelines for librarians, teachers, students and whānau

    Te Kete Ipurangi (TKI) provides guidance to help your school community understand their responsibilities and what they need to do.

    For library staff

    For teachers and contractors

    For students

    For principals and trustees

    For parents and whānau

    Students will rely on teachers and librarians to show them best practice in using, re-using, sharing, and creating digital works and resources. As a school librarian, you'll need to know the guidelines and policies that your school has regarding copyright and be able to help students understand their responsibilities.

  • Guidelines for librarians, teachers, students and whānau

    Te Kete Ipurangi (TKI) provides guidance to help your school community understand their responsibilities and what they need to do.

    For library staff

    For teachers and contractors

    For students

    For principals and trustees

    For parents and whānau

    Students will rely on teachers and librarians to show them best practice in using, re-using, sharing, and creating digital works and resources. As a school librarian, you'll need to know the guidelines and policies that your school has regarding copyright and be able to help students understand their responsibilities.

  • Getting permission to use copyright materials

    You need permission, sometimes in the form of a licence, to use copyright material. You get permission from the owner of the work, usually:

    • the person who created the work, or
    • the institution they were employed by to do that work.

    Copyright licences for schools

    There are a number of licences that let schools and educational institutions use extra material for educational purposes — material that under the Copyright Act couldn't be used without getting permission directly from the copyright owner. Your school must have these licences in order to copy or use material.They give you permission to copy from a range of copyright protected resources, including:

    • parts of books, newspapers, magazines
    • clips from television and other multimedia sources.

    Copyright Licensing New Zealand (CLNZ) provides licence schemes especially for schools — the amount you pay depends on the number of students in your school. The licences ensure that the copyright owners are paid when you copy or use their work.

    Primary and secondary schools license

    The Get licensed website helps schools find out what level of copyright cover they need. It includes tools to help you work out which licences you need and how much they're likely to cost.

    Get licensed

  • Getting permission to use copyright materials

    You need permission, sometimes in the form of a licence, to use copyright material. You get permission from the owner of the work, usually:

    • the person who created the work, or
    • the institution they were employed by to do that work.

    Copyright licences for schools

    There are a number of licences that let schools and educational institutions use extra material for educational purposes — material that under the Copyright Act couldn't be used without getting permission directly from the copyright owner. Your school must have these licences in order to copy or use material.They give you permission to copy from a range of copyright protected resources, including:

    • parts of books, newspapers, magazines
    • clips from television and other multimedia sources.

    Copyright Licensing New Zealand (CLNZ) provides licence schemes especially for schools — the amount you pay depends on the number of students in your school. The licences ensure that the copyright owners are paid when you copy or use their work.

    Primary and secondary schools license

    The Get licensed website helps schools find out what level of copyright cover they need. It includes tools to help you work out which licences you need and how much they're likely to cost.

    Get licensed

  • Acknowledging or citing your sources

    When using the ideas, images or words of others, it's helpful to readers and respectful to the copyright owner to acknowledge their work. How you acknowledge the source can vary depending on whether it's a magazine article, website, book, poem, movie, interview, email or photograph.

    Citing your sources makes it clear where your information came from, and whose opinions or arguments you have used. It helps distinguish your ideas from other peoples and can show the breadth of the research you have undertaken.

    Standard referencing tools

    There are many systems used for writing citations and each follows a specific format. The main ones used in New Zealand are:

    • American Psychological Association (APA)
    • Modern Language Association of America (MLA)
    • Chicago/Turabian, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style.

    Some useful referencing tools include the following:

    Plagiarism

    Plagiarism is stealing or using or passing off someone else’s work, words or ideas as your own — even if it's accidental. Plagiarism also includes:

    • paraphrasing or rewording another person's work, without acknowledging the source.
    • the unwarranted use of literary works, music, speeches, images and visual art and computer programmes, including code.

    Plagiarising other people’s intellectual property is regarded as totally unacceptable in all school and tertiary educational institutions — assignments from students who plagiarise are often failed. You can avoid plagiarism by acknowledging all your sources.

    Plagiarism can take the form of:

    • wholesale copying
    • stealing phrases and ideas
    • paraphrasing language, ideas and structure
    • mixing and matching
    • recycling
    • lazy citation
    • fake or dead source list.

    This list was taken from Andrianes Pinantoan's plagiarism post on InformED. It's a great resource which covers many aspects of plagiarism, including types, how to recognise it, how to avoid it and plagiarism checkers and resources.

    Plagiarism by Andrianes Pinantoan

  • Acknowledging or citing your sources

    When using the ideas, images or words of others, it's helpful to readers and respectful to the copyright owner to acknowledge their work. How you acknowledge the source can vary depending on whether it's a magazine article, website, book, poem, movie, interview, email or photograph.

    Citing your sources makes it clear where your information came from, and whose opinions or arguments you have used. It helps distinguish your ideas from other peoples and can show the breadth of the research you have undertaken.

    Standard referencing tools

    There are many systems used for writing citations and each follows a specific format. The main ones used in New Zealand are:

    • American Psychological Association (APA)
    • Modern Language Association of America (MLA)
    • Chicago/Turabian, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style.

    Some useful referencing tools include the following:

    Plagiarism

    Plagiarism is stealing or using or passing off someone else’s work, words or ideas as your own — even if it's accidental. Plagiarism also includes:

    • paraphrasing or rewording another person's work, without acknowledging the source.
    • the unwarranted use of literary works, music, speeches, images and visual art and computer programmes, including code.

    Plagiarising other people’s intellectual property is regarded as totally unacceptable in all school and tertiary educational institutions — assignments from students who plagiarise are often failed. You can avoid plagiarism by acknowledging all your sources.

    Plagiarism can take the form of:

    • wholesale copying
    • stealing phrases and ideas
    • paraphrasing language, ideas and structure
    • mixing and matching
    • recycling
    • lazy citation
    • fake or dead source list.

    This list was taken from Andrianes Pinantoan's plagiarism post on InformED. It's a great resource which covers many aspects of plagiarism, including types, how to recognise it, how to avoid it and plagiarism checkers and resources.

    Plagiarism by Andrianes Pinantoan

  • Creative Commons — sharing your work

    Creative Commons is a non-profit organisation that helps people share their copyright works for re-use by others. Sometimes creators and other copyright holders want the public to be able to re-use their works but under the Copyright Act can't legally do this without giving direct permission to each person who wants to use their work. Creative Commons licences enable copyright holders to allow re-use of their works by giving everyone a range of permissions in advance.

    Creative Commons (CC) licences

    Creative Commons enables individuals or organisations to licence their work under one of 4 elements:

    • Attribution — you must credit the original creator of the work.
    • NonCommercial — the work can't be shared, adapted or re-used if you intend to make money out of it.
    • NoDerivatives — you can share the work, but must not change it.
    • ShareAlike — if you adapt or remix the work, you must use the same Creative Commons licence as the original.

    Creative Commons combines these four elements to make 6 licences:

    • Attribution
    • Attribution-NonCommercial
    • Attribution-ShareAlike
    • Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike
    • Attribution-NoDerivatives
    • Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives.

    CC licences explained

    Creative Commons Kiwi (video, 5:32) — great for introducing Creative Commons licensing to students.

    Creating Creative Commons resources in schools

    Creative Commons in Schools provides information, case studies and resources for schools looking to develop a Creative Commons policy. Using CC licences let school staff legally share and collaborate with other New Zealand educators.

    Creative Commons in schools

    Some schools are already implementing a fundamental change to their policies related to copyright and intellectual property to help them share resources. A Creative Commons policy for resources created by teachers in your school allows for those resources to be easily and transparently shared with colleagues in other schools.

    The Principal and the Board of Trustees usually make decisions about whether a school will have a Creative Commons policy.

    Albany Senior High School's policy — a guide to how a school can create a workable intellectual property policy

  • Creative Commons — sharing your work

    Creative Commons is a non-profit organisation that helps people share their copyright works for re-use by others. Sometimes creators and other copyright holders want the public to be able to re-use their works but under the Copyright Act can't legally do this without giving direct permission to each person who wants to use their work. Creative Commons licences enable copyright holders to allow re-use of their works by giving everyone a range of permissions in advance.

    Creative Commons (CC) licences

    Creative Commons enables individuals or organisations to licence their work under one of 4 elements:

    • Attribution — you must credit the original creator of the work.
    • NonCommercial — the work can't be shared, adapted or re-used if you intend to make money out of it.
    • NoDerivatives — you can share the work, but must not change it.
    • ShareAlike — if you adapt or remix the work, you must use the same Creative Commons licence as the original.

    Creative Commons combines these four elements to make 6 licences:

    • Attribution
    • Attribution-NonCommercial
    • Attribution-ShareAlike
    • Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike
    • Attribution-NoDerivatives
    • Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives.

    CC licences explained

    Creative Commons Kiwi (video, 5:32) — great for introducing Creative Commons licensing to students.

    Creating Creative Commons resources in schools

    Creative Commons in Schools provides information, case studies and resources for schools looking to develop a Creative Commons policy. Using CC licences let school staff legally share and collaborate with other New Zealand educators.

    Creative Commons in schools

    Some schools are already implementing a fundamental change to their policies related to copyright and intellectual property to help them share resources. A Creative Commons policy for resources created by teachers in your school allows for those resources to be easily and transparently shared with colleagues in other schools.

    The Principal and the Board of Trustees usually make decisions about whether a school will have a Creative Commons policy.

    Albany Senior High School's policy — a guide to how a school can create a workable intellectual property policy