Ideas for exploring Te Horeta's nail

Embedded content: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C7kvVshJiJA

Ideas for using the curiosity card featuring Te Horeta’s nail with junior primary students.


Transcript

Visual

Video title: Ideas for exploring 'Te Horeta's nail'. Subtitle: With junior primary students

Indira Neville sitting on a sofa at the Auckland Services to Schools Centre, with books and shelves in the background.

Texts appears:

Indira Neville
Services to Schools
National Library of New Zealand
Te Puna Mātauranga o Aotearoa

Audio

My name is Indira Neville. I'm the Principal Advisor at Services to Schools at the National Library. I'm going to be talking about using the 'Ship's nail' curiosity card with juniors.


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Photo: 'Te Horeta's nail' curiosity card — front and back.

Photo: A rusty nail.

Photo: Close-up of nails in wooden fence posts.

Photo: Close-up of a child using a toy hammer and nails.

Photo: Children around an outdoor table using bucket containers.

Audio

I'm going to be talking about using the 'Ship's nail' curiosity card with juniors. So, in the research part of exploring this card and exploring the related fertile questions, I might do things like, for example, take my class on a 'nail hunt' around the school. So, look for nails. Where are they? What are they doing? I might get some hammers and nails. You can get little ones for little kids and get them to make some boats and float these and watch what happens. Then I might get them to remove the nails or some of the nails ... and see what happens when they try and float them this time.


Visual

Indira Neville on the sofa.

Photo: 2 old, rusty nails.

Audio

Also, I might get them to use some alternate materials. For example, Sellotape instead of a nail and ... to see what happens ... Then you could do some really great concept mapping around the material properties of nails.


Visual

Indira Neville on the sofa.

Photo: Historical painting showing a ship moored at a coastal settlement.

Audio

You could also get your class to set up a museum with different kinds of 'precious categories'. So, you might have a category that's around 'items that have practical value' ... a category that's around 'items that are worth money' — you might just have photos of these rather than the family jewels actually in the classroom. And then you might have 'items that have personal value.'

You could also use nails to carve into balsa or polystyrene and do some printmaking ... and perhaps the images would be things related to the ships, the Endeavour, James Cook, that kind of thing.


Visual

Video and photo credits:

Curiosity card CC0002
www.natlib.govt.nz/schools/teaching-and-learning-resources

Ship’s nail. Carver unknown. Gift of Wakahuia Carkeek, 1965. Ref: ME011382 Museum of New Zealand. All rights reserved.

The Bark, Earl of Pembroke, later Endeavour, leaving Whitby Harbour in 1768, ca 1790 by Thomas Luny. Ref: PIC Screen 98 #R3397 National Library of Australia. Public domain.

Video ends.