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Ngā Upoko Tukutuku

English | Māori

Ngā kaupapa hou | New terms – Pipiri | Hune | June 2022

Hamarara - Umbrellas
Heru - Combs
Ipu - Bowls
Kāheru - Spades
Kahu whakatere - Burial wraps
Kāuta - Cookhouses
Kirimate - Mourners
Kumete - Bowls
Kumete whakairo – Carved bowls
Motopaika - Motorbikes
Papa hou – Treasure boxes
Pari - Bodices
Taonga whakarākei - Body adornments
Taputapu whakairo - Carving tools
Tāpeka - Sashes
Tāraitanga - Sculpture
Tēneti - Tents
Tïpare - Headbands
Tokotoko (Tikanga tuku iho) – Walking sticks
Wharau - Sheds

More information about new and changed terms

We have added several terms which may be used to describe taonga in library and archival collections. These include Tokotoko (Tikanga tuku iho), ceremonial staffs which may also be used as walking sticks and Papa hou, square or rectangular carved boxes for holding treasured items.

Terms have also been created for Kumete whakairo (Carved food bowls with lids), Kumete (Food preparation containers) and Ipu (Bowls and Containers). On a related note, a new term has been added for sculpture, Tāraitanga, while Taputapu whakairo describes carving tools.

The terms relating to jewellery, adornments and personal items have been clarified and expanded. The new term Taonga whakarākei has been added as a collective term for adornments and body ornaments worn to signify status, leadership and whakapapa, or at significant events. It does not include necklaces and earrings, which are instead classed with Whakakai (Jewelry). Narrower concepts of Taonga whakarākei include Tāpeka (Diagonal shoulder belts or sashes), Tīpare (Headbands) and Heru (Combs).

As Heru have a functional as well as a decorative purpose, Heru also sit under the broader term Taputapu, which encompasses utensils, property and equipment. Please note that at the time of this release we are aware of an issue with the Taonga whakarākei display that means the heke (narrower terms) are not displaying correctly. This will be corrected during the next release, but in the meantime the relevant narrower terms mentioned above are all accessible via search or alphabetical browse.

Some of the terms relating to Tangihanga have been revised and expanded. Kirimate may be used to describe mourners while Kahu whakatere refers to burial wraps and shrouds, predominantly woven from harakeke.

We have added new terms to describe buildings and structures in both historical and contemporary contexts. These include Kāuta (Cookhouses and kitchens), Wharau (Temporary shelters) and Tēneti (Tents).

Using Ngā Upoko Tukutuku

Search to find standardised terms for subjects in te reo Māori. Use them when cataloguing and describing relevant material.

How Ngā Upoko Tukutuku works

Conceptual framework

In the Māori worldview, aspects of taha tinana/the people, taha wairua/the spiritual and taha hinengaro/the mind are intrinsically connected and related to each other. This model recognises both the traditional and contemporary perspectives.

A diagram showing the primary elements of the Māori worldview and their relationships.

Building a thesaurus requires adherence to standard conventions in the use of terms and how they are applied. Ngā Upoko Tukutuku uses a framework that retains the integrity of both worlds.

About the project

Ngā Upoku Tukutuku was developed by the Māori Subject Headings Project, jointly sponsored by LIANZA, Te Rōpū Whakahau, and the National Library.

The tool provides a structured path to a Māori world view within library and archival cataloguing and description. It supports cataloguers and descriptive archivists to assign appropriate terms for the material, and helps users find those items within a framework they relate to.

The terms listed are not a dictionary, and shouldn’t be seen as authoritative beyond their use in libraries and archives.

New terms are developed by Te Whakakaokao, the Ngā Upoko Tukutuku Reo Māori Working Group.

Logos for Te Rōpū Whakahau, LIANZA and National Library

Ngā kaupapa hou

Ngā kaupapa hou / New terms – Pipiri | Hune | June 2022

Hamarara - Umbrellas
Heru - Combs
Ipu - Bowls
Kāheru - Spades
Kahu whakatere - Burial wraps
Kāuta - Cookhouses
Kirimate - Mourners
Kumete - Bowls
Kumete whakairo – Carved bowls
Motopaika - Motorbikes
Papa hou – Treasure boxes
Pari - Bodices
Taonga whakarākei - Body adornments
Taputapu whakairo - Carving tools
Tāpeka - Sashes
Tāraitanga - Sculpture
Tēneti - Tents
Tïpare - Headbands
Tokotoko (Tikanga tuku iho) – Walking sticks
Wharau - Sheds

Te Whakamahi i Ngā Upoko Tukutuku

Rapu hei kimi i ngā kupu arowhānui mō ngā kaupapa i roto i te reo Māori. Whakamahia ēnei ina whakarārangi ana me te whakamārama rauemi hāngai.

Pēhea te mahi a Ngā Upoko Tukutuku

Poutarāwaho Ariā

I te ao Māori, nā Io te orokohanga me te whakaotinga. Kei te tūhonohono me te hāngai ngā āhuatanga o te taha tinana, taha wairua me te taha hinengaro. E whakamana ana tēnei Tauira i I ngā tirohanga tūturu, hou hoki.

A diagram showing the primary elements of the Māori worldview and their relationships.

E hiahiatia ana e te hanganga punakupu kia mau ki ngā tikanga arowhānui mō te whakamahi i ngā kupu, ā, me pēhea te whakamahi. Ka whakamahia e Ngā Upoko Tukutuku tētahi poutarāwaho e mau ana i te mana o ngā ao e rua.

Mō te kaupapa

He mea waihanga te Rārangi Ingoa Iwi Hapū e te Kaupapa Upoko Tukutuku Māori, he mea tautoko e LIANZA, Te Rōpū Whakahau me Te Puna Mātauranga o Aotearoa.

Ka tukuna e te utauta he ara hanganga ki tētahi tirohanga ao Māori i roto i ngā whakarārangitanga me ngā whakamāramatanga whare pukapuka me te pūranga. He tautoko i ngā kaiwhakarārangi me ngā kaitiaki pūranga ki te whakarite i ngā kupu tika mō ngā rauemi, me te āwhina i ngā kaiwhakamahi ki te kimi i aua tuemi i roto i tētahi poutarāwaho e hāngai ana.

Ehara ngā ingoa e rārangi ana i te papakupu, ka mutu e whakamahia noatia ana mō roto i ngā whare pukapuka me ngā pūranga.

Ka waihangatia ngā kupu hou e Te Whakakaokao, Te Ropū Mahi Reo Māori Ngā Upoko Tukutuku Reo Māori.

Logos for Te Rōpū Whakahau, LIANZA and National Library