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New Zealand Libraries Partnership Programme

Find out about the COVID-19 recovery work being led by the National Library to support librarians and library services across New Zealand. We update this page regularly.

Page updated 13 April 2022

Latest News from NZLPP

The NZLPP Programme Board made some key decisions about unallocated programme funding at their 17 March meeting. As a result, funding is being made available as transition payments. The application process for these payments has now begun.

An amount of $2m is being allocated for transition payments for public libraries, allowing for up to $30,000 per local authority plus a consideration for hardship. The intention of these payments is to support libraries as they transition out of the programme. Public library managers have now been sent further information around the transition payments, hardship relief and how to apply for these.
Additionally, Te Puna Services subscription fees will be waived for a further year (1 July 2022 to 30 June 2023) with the exception of the same State sector organisations previously excluded. The Te Puna Services team will be in touch with all libraries directly to confirm this.

Approximately $1m has been allocated for the continuation of the sustainability initiatives, including a Mātauranga Māori initiative, in the next financial year. While details are still to be confirmed, the high-level approach agreed is to explore the establishment of a project team hosted by the National Library; and to fund capability support within the sector for the implementation of this mahi.

New Zealand’s library system COVID-19 recovery

The Government is entrusting the National Library to lead and support COVID-19 recovery work across New Zealand’s library system, especially in public libraries, with a funding package of $58.8 million, over two to four years. The New Zealand Libraries Partnership Programme (NZLPP) will support librarians and library services to be retained in NZ libraries and assist them to support community recovery.

Read the Beehive announcement on the original funding package

Have a look at the New Zealand Libraries Partnership Programme in action

New Zealand Libraries Partnership Programme one year in

Te Pouhuaki National Librarian, Rachel Esson says, “To date, we've worked with 66 out of 67 local authorities to be able to put in place programs that are going to increase the impact that libraries have and I'm really proud of the work that's been done by the library sector making this program successful.

We’ve heard people were concerned about the long-term sustainability of this work. We've been working with the sector to make sure we can put some things in place that mean, when this money finishes, we'll continue to have that positive impact.

The first of three key initiatives revolves around data collection and evidence. We want to be able to provide the data demonstrating the positive impact that libraries have in their communities.

The second is our workforce development strategy. I strongly believe that this is where we can have a huge impact for libraries — increasing the diversity of our workforce, along with the capability and skills we have, in order to support our communities and make sure that libraries are making the best impact they can.

Our third key initiative is a strategic review of National Library’s core services to New Zealand libraries (such as EPIC, Te Puna, Kōtui and APNK services) including recommendations for the sustainability of Services to Libraries over the medium term (3 to 5 years).

I want to thank the library sector all for the work they’ve been doing, we all want to make sure that this recovery programme has the best outcomes for Aotearoa.”

To date, over 180 people have been hired and are actively working in public libraries as a direct result of the programme funding.

Procurement costs for Kōtui, along with subscription charges for electronic resources, Te Puna services, and APNK membership have been waived to the value of $8.576m over the two financial years.

APNK has been made available free of charge to 50 councils. Four councils (including the Chatham Islands) are in the process of joining APNK and another five have been provided with assistance to keep their public library internet free of charge.

Eleven Strategic Partnership Grants have been awarded totalling $5.024m for projects that benefit New Zealand’s wider library sector in the long term.

Rachel Esson Te Pouhuaki National Librarian talks about NZLPP

Embedded content: https://youtu.be/Q51bXDuej6k
  • Transcript

    Speaker

    Rachel Esson

    Kia ora koutou, ko Rachel tōku ingoa.

    Ko te Pouhuaki o Te Puna Mātauranga o Aotearoa taku mahi. My name is Rachel Esson. I'm the National Librarian and I'm here to talk to you about the New Zealand Libraries Partnership Program, or NZLPP, as we like to call it. This program came about through government funding from COVID recovery.

    We received nearly 60 million dollars of funding that was announced in May 2020,
    and I'm really pleased to be able to tell you today about what we've achieved one year on. And also to thank you, those who have worked with us to enable this program to be a success.

    Our Minister, Minister Tinetti, just announced 11 grants that we have been able to fund through this program, nearly 5 million dollars. These are things that are
    going to have a long-term impact on our sector.

    As part of the program, we've also funded over a 170 positions in libraries
    all around the country. These librarians are working on programs like community engagement and digital inclusion.

    We've also got 50 libraries who are part of Aotearoa People’s Network Kaharoa or APNK. This provides free Wi-Fi to libraries and communities all
    around the country.

    We've worked with 66 out of 67 local authorities, to be able to put in place programs that are going to increase the impact that libraries have.

    We've also heard that people have been concerned about the long-term sustainability of this work. We have heard that clearly, and we're working with you, to make sure we can put some things in place that mean, when this money finishes, we're still continuing to have that positive impact.

    Two of the really key initiatives, revolve around data collection and evidence.
    And we know that we want to be able to provide the data that shows that positive
    impact that libraries have.

    The other thing is our Workforce Development strategy. I strongly believe that this is where we can have a huge impact for libraries and that's increasing the diversity of our workforce and also the capability and skills that we have in order to support our communities, and make sure that libraries are providing the best impact that they can.

    I'm really proud of the work that's been done by the library sector. So, thank you all for the work that you've been doing. We look forward to working with you more to make sure that this money, and this COVID recovery has best outcomes for Aotearoa, New Zealand.

    Kia ora.

Transcript

Speaker

Rachel Esson

Kia ora koutou, ko Rachel tōku ingoa.

Ko te Pouhuaki o Te Puna Mātauranga o Aotearoa taku mahi. My name is Rachel Esson. I'm the National Librarian and I'm here to talk to you about the New Zealand Libraries Partnership Program, or NZLPP, as we like to call it. This program came about through government funding from COVID recovery.

We received nearly 60 million dollars of funding that was announced in May 2020,
and I'm really pleased to be able to tell you today about what we've achieved one year on. And also to thank you, those who have worked with us to enable this program to be a success.

Our Minister, Minister Tinetti, just announced 11 grants that we have been able to fund through this program, nearly 5 million dollars. These are things that are
going to have a long-term impact on our sector.

As part of the program, we've also funded over a 170 positions in libraries
all around the country. These librarians are working on programs like community engagement and digital inclusion.

We've also got 50 libraries who are part of Aotearoa People’s Network Kaharoa or APNK. This provides free Wi-Fi to libraries and communities all
around the country.

We've worked with 66 out of 67 local authorities, to be able to put in place programs that are going to increase the impact that libraries have.

We've also heard that people have been concerned about the long-term sustainability of this work. We have heard that clearly, and we're working with you, to make sure we can put some things in place that mean, when this money finishes, we're still continuing to have that positive impact.

Two of the really key initiatives, revolve around data collection and evidence.
And we know that we want to be able to provide the data that shows that positive
impact that libraries have.

The other thing is our Workforce Development strategy. I strongly believe that this is where we can have a huge impact for libraries and that's increasing the diversity of our workforce and also the capability and skills that we have in order to support our communities, and make sure that libraries are providing the best impact that they can.

I'm really proud of the work that's been done by the library sector. So, thank you all for the work that you've been doing. We look forward to working with you more to make sure that this money, and this COVID recovery has best outcomes for Aotearoa, New Zealand.

Kia ora.


Programme outcomes

The NZLPP works in partnerships to enable the programme to turn goals into outcomes. The libraries we work with support: hapū, iwi and other minority ethnic communities; community organisations; schools and kura; ministries; and NGOs.

We are supporting retention of collaborative library services such as cataloguing, resource licensing and library management systems. We are enabling public internet to be available free of charge in public libraries throughout Aotearoa. We are building capability through training, mentoring and upskilling secondee librarians.

Short-term outcomes for the first one to two years are:

  • key stakeholders value libraries
  • enhanced engagement and reach with key communities
  • improved skills of librarians and community
  • broader range of services that meet local community needs
  • increased community access to digital services and support
  • increased diversity of partnerships.

Medium-term outcomes over the next three to five years are:

  • improved partnering with other libraries and organisations
  • retaining and strengthening librarian skills and services
  • improved rates of library usage by broader range of people and groups
  • wider variety of pathways into library work.

Long-term outcomes over the next six to ten years are:

  • improved sustainability of libraries
  • improved diversity in libraries
  • improved library capability.

Focus areas

Six focus area options for library staff supported by the programme were identified through early stakeholder engagement. When signing up to the programme each library selected one or more focus areas for their community. The programme is now developing the level of support and training needed for each focus area to make the greatest possible difference for the community in:

  1. Digital inclusion, supporting and assisting job seekers and learners – including digital literacy for seniors, children and young people.
  2. Library workforce development, supporting an increasingly diverse workforce – including retention and development of Māori and Pasifika staff, leadership development, trainee recruitment and career progression development.
  3. Community engagement, supporting community recovery – including capability building, co-design skills, programming and outreach and by targeting non-users.
  4. Reading for pleasure, supporting wellbeing — including local programme, partnerships and support for young people, whānau and communities.
  5. Te reo and mātauranga Māori, supporting local iwi – including skills development
  6. Content creation and curation of online NZ resources, with a focus on local resources.

Sustainability initiatives

Now that we are more than halfway through the funded COVID recovery period, National Library are preparing to place the NZLPP mahi into the hands of the sector. From January 2022 the programme will focus on the transition, with the view to wind up most of its activity by June.

Having listened to feedback, hearing concerns around sustainability, the NZLPP team want to ensure that our two-year programme can have longer term impacts so that libraries can continue to support their communities to thrive.

The programme reset updates our programme team structure and governance, including shifting the Steering Group into a more strategic role that could be sustained after the programme closure.

The overarching objective of the reset is to prioritise our remaining resources to enable a sustainable and enduring libraries sector that meets community needs and is supported by decision-makers, by:

  • laying the foundations for a strong data culture and data, research and evidence base on the social and economic value libraries services deliver, and building a compelling narrative on the value of libraries to communities and Aotearoa
  • building the infrastructure to support broadening and strengthening libraries workforce capability, and
  • considering collaborative business models for the sector, and policy and funding options that support sustainable and equitable libraries services across Aotearoa.

Key areas included are:

  • Workforce Capability: Sector workforce development — this project will work towards addressing inadequate sector capability, by developing a sector workforce capability framework.
  • Services to Libraries — this project aims to identify service efficiencies and inform future sustainability options for National Library services to the sector, primarily APNK, EPIC, Te Puna and Kōtui.
  • Libraries sector data, research and evidence — this project will work towards addressing the insufficiency of data about the libraries sector and evidence of the value of libraries, by developing a sector ‘value proposition’ and data, research and evidence strategy.

The team are also identifying options to assist libraries to more easily transition into the next financial year as the programme funding comes to an end.

Strategic partnership grants

The National Library invited nine organisations to submit proposals for non-contestable grants that will benefit New Zealand’s wider library sector. These organisations are: Library and Information Association New Zealand Aotearoa (LIANZA); Te Rōpū Whakahau; Public Libraries of New Zealand (PLNZ); School Library Association of New Zealand Aotearoa (SLANZA); Council of New Zealand University Librarians (CONZUL); Auckland Libraries, Te Puna Foundation, Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ); and Taituarā.

The grants are being offered as an opportunity to build on the work already delivered by the NZLPP and broaden its support to the wider library sector in a strategic way that contributes to its sustainability.

The proposals were reviewed by members of the Library and Information Advisory Commission (LIAC), who are appointed by the Minister of Internal Affairs to provide her with advice on library and information issues, including mātauranga Māori.

Successful strategic partnership grants

Eleven Strategic Partnership Grants have been awarded, totalling $5.024. Sector organisations were encouraged to partner with others and seven of the successful projects are collaborations. Grant proposals were assessed with assistance from the Library and Information Advisory Commission (LIAC) and decisions were informed by their recommendations.

Project partners include: Te Takarangi, New Zealand Book Awards Trust, Tohatoha, National Library’s Services to Schools and the University of Canterbury.

The project details for the strategic grants are as follows:

Organisation Progamme Grant
Te Rōpū Whakahau Mātauranga Māori Professional Development project $200,000
Te Rōpū Whakahau Te Takarangi ki te Ao, expanding knowledge and appreciation for Māori scholarship, mātauranga and academic excellence $500,000
LIANZA New Zealand Book Awards for Children and Young Adults – Books Alive events $76,000
SLANZA Communities of Learning/ Kahui Ako and School Libraries Collaboration Pilot Programme $48,000
SLANZA School Librarians Collaboration with Many Answers Pilot Programme $200,000
SLANZA A Bit Sus, a misinformation education involving school libraries $150,000
LGNZ Employing a full time "Libraries Adviser" for 2 years $450,000
PLNZ and Taituarā Public Libraries Co‐Cre8 – a coordinated approach to national data collection $550,000
LIANZA and SLANZA Strengthening the Library and Information Workforce: Tertiary Grants $1,500,000
Te Puna Foundation Communities of Readers (CoR) Phase 2: Strengthening reading engagement through library and community partnerships $850,000
Auckland Libraries, CONZUL and University of Canterbury He Kupenga Horopounamu – a programme of work to change Libraries’ practice and service design to achieve better outcomes for Māori Communities $500,000

Governance

The programme is supported by a Board and a Sector Reference Group (formerly the Steering Group).

The purpose of the Programme Board is to ensure the successful delivery of the Programme by providing oversight and decision making to ensure the objectives are achieved and long-term outcomes are on track.

The purpose of the Sector Reference Group is to champion the programme and provide advice, guidance and support during the programme’s lifecycle to ensure it remains on track to support long-term sector outcomes.

Membership includes sector representatives from Taituarā, LIANZA, Te Rōpū Whakahau, PLNZ, LGNZ, CONZUL, SLANZA.

Programme advisory

The NZLPP Programme Advisory comprises three groups.

  • The Training Advisory Group is a small group of representatives from partners, public libraries and ITO’s are available as an Advisory Group to the Programme Director and team. They will use their expertise across training, skills enhancement and the public library sector to support and guide the programme of initiatives.
  • The Programme Advisory Group are individuals brought together to discuss and deal with operational issues for the programme and the workstreams within. They provide advice and guidance as subject matter experts to support programme delivery.
  • The Programme Working Group is made up of internal National Library and programme team members. It is an extension of the programme team and meets weekly to discuss programme progress and seek feedback and input from relevant National Library subject matter experts.

These advisory groups will form the basis for the next stage of sustainability mahi, however the programme team is actively looking at options to expand and vary the capabilities needed to support.

Free public internet

COVID-19 has helped underline the importance of the public being able to access the internet for information and services without cost being a barrier. The free internet provision is aimed at members of the public being able to access the internet for free through their local library wherever they are in New Zealand and regardless of whether they own a device.

The programme aims to achieve this through:
- waiving of subscription fees for Councils that use the Aotearoa People’s Network Kaharoa (APNK) service
- working with Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch libraries to support their existing free internet offers
- providing all remaining Councils with the opportunity to join the APNK service at no charge and support for free public internet and device provision in those libraries — for a period of two years.

Fee waivers

The programme is providing relief for New Zealand libraries by the waiver of user charges and procurement costs for collaborative library services. Libraries are free to use the value of the fee waiver on any library expense. The fee waiver does not cover the services provided by Kōtui.

Te Puna and EPIC fee waiver

Te Puna and EPIC member subscription fees will be waived for the period 1 July 2020 to 30 June 2022, with the exception of some State sector organisations.

Te Puna services
EPIC

EPIC subscriptions covered by NZLPP

The NZLLP is also funding the following additional subscriptions through EPIC to the end of June 2022.

For more information on how to register your library for access to these subscription options, email epic@dia.govt.nz

Kōtui

Kōtui libraries will not receive a fee waiver; instead, the Kōtui consortium will get one-off relief from upcoming procurement costs relating to the supplier contract.

Kōtui

Secondees

A key part of the programme is upskilling librarians, so that they can provide greater support for library users coping with the disruption and change inherent in our COVID reality. Focus areas for development are as diverse as project management, digital inclusion, and te Reo and Mātauranga Māori.

The programme’s Learning Management System (LMS) site offers available across all priority areas and continues to be built out. The uptake over the first 4 months shows:

  • 175 librarians and 81 managers engaged, 183 enrolled in learning
  • 1887 courses added to learning plans
  • 194 courses completed

We have also set up a well-used Community of Practice platform, on a dedicated Slack channel, for each focus area: digital inclusion, reading for pleasure, community engagement, workforce development, te reo and mātauranga Maori, and content creation. We have 192 members, with half of these active online on any given week.

Have a question?

Get in touch if you have a question, email us at librariespartner@dia.govt.nz


Feature image at top of page. Library in Cheviot New Zealand. Photo by Michal Klajban. Wikicommons. CC BY-SA