Accordions

He Tohu and the Services to Schools section of the website use accordions.

How to create an accordion

On the page that you want to add an accordion:

  • Under content elements
    • Create a new entry and link
    • select 'Accordion'
  • Add a title. The title display is optional.
  • Description field — I'm a confused about what this is for.
  • Add 'AccordionItems' 3 you can "Create new Content block and link' or 'Link existing entries' — Content blocks added here become the accordion slides.

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The accordion content model has 3 parts.
- Title (this does not display on the page).
- A description field. This is a normal markdown field which will take formatted text and images.
- AccordionItems field. Content blocks added here become the accordion slides.



Where to use an accordion

Accordions are used in Services to Schools and He Tohu learning content.

They allow the content to be structured so that the user can show or hide blocks of content they do or do not want to see.

The behaviour is for the slides to be closed when the user first opens the webpage.

  • 150 years of Alice Blog Body

    Cartoon of Alice in Wonderland.
    Always follow the white rabbit. Some rights reserved

    A recent article in the School Library Journal celebrated 150 years of Alice in Wonderland.

    We’ve seen many illustrators create visual magic through different versions of Alice and her Wonderland world including my favourites Helen Oxenbury and Anthony Browne. Alice Popova’s post ‘The best illustrations from 150 years of Alice in Wonderland’ includes illustrations from Tove Jansson, Salvador Dali and a pop-up version.

    The British Library also has Lewis Carroll’s original handwritten version created for Alice Liddell, which you can explore online. In addition to thumbing through page by page, you can choose to listen to the wonderful Miriam Margolyes reading the story. Anyone visiting London over the next few months can visit a special Alice in Wonderland exhibition at the British Library Friday 20 Nov 2015 – Sun 17 April 2016.

    For a comprehensive history and details of different events celebrating this story’s 150th birthday MacMillan have created a website full of Alice and her adventures.

    Will Alice, the White Rabbit, and the Mad Hatter be visiting your library in Term 4?

    Read more about promoting reading at your school.

    Image: Always follow the white rabbit by anokarina on Flickr

  • 150 years of Alice Blog Body

    Cartoon of Alice in Wonderland.
    Always follow the white rabbit. Some rights reserved

    A recent article in the School Library Journal celebrated 150 years of Alice in Wonderland.

    We’ve seen many illustrators create visual magic through different versions of Alice and her Wonderland world including my favourites Helen Oxenbury and Anthony Browne. Alice Popova’s post ‘The best illustrations from 150 years of Alice in Wonderland’ includes illustrations from Tove Jansson, Salvador Dali and a pop-up version.

    The British Library also has Lewis Carroll’s original handwritten version created for Alice Liddell, which you can explore online. In addition to thumbing through page by page, you can choose to listen to the wonderful Miriam Margolyes reading the story. Anyone visiting London over the next few months can visit a special Alice in Wonderland exhibition at the British Library Friday 20 Nov 2015 – Sun 17 April 2016.

    For a comprehensive history and details of different events celebrating this story’s 150th birthday MacMillan have created a website full of Alice and her adventures.

    Will Alice, the White Rabbit, and the Mad Hatter be visiting your library in Term 4?

    Read more about promoting reading at your school.

    Image: Always follow the white rabbit by anokarina on Flickr