Hetohu

For more information, email events.natlib@dia.govt.nz.

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The history of equal pay in New Zealand

5.30pm to 6.45pm, Thursday 17 August 2017

Free

Te Ahumairangi (ground floor), National Library, corner Molesworth and Aitken Streets

Hear the ongoing story of the fight for equal pay.

This talk considers the history of women’s campaigns for wage justice in Aotearoa/New Zealand. It canvases why campaigns for equal pay that resulted in the Equal Pay Acts of 1960 and 1972 did not eradicate the wage gap, and explores subsequent campaigns premised on equal pay for work of equal value and opportunity.

Cybèle Locke will briefly examine the Kristine Bartlett and Service and Food Workers’ Union case, which won equal pay for work of equal value for age-care workers.

Space is limited so arrive early!

About the speaker

Cybèle Locke is a Lecturer in the School of History, Philosophy, Political Science & International Relations at Victoria University of Wellington.

For more information, email events.natlib@dia.govt.nz.

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Hetohu

Space is limited, so book your spot by emailing events.natlib@dia.govt.nz

RSVP via email

The ethics of treaties

5.30pm to 6.45pm, Thursday 31 August 2017

Free

Te Ahumairangi (ground floor), National Library, corner Molesworth and Aitken Streets

The ethical and moral obligations created by Te Tiriti

Simon Keller examines the moral issues raised by treaties. He looks first at the nature of treaties. What is a treaty? Should a treaty be understood primarily as a promise, or an agreement on a strategy for mutual cooperation, or a tactical move in a larger conflict, or something else?

In light of the possible answers to this question, the talk goes on to ask what moral power a treaty can hold. Which people or institutions – and which future people or institutions – receive moral rights and moral duties as a result of the signing of a treaty? Does it matter whether the treaty is a good treaty, or a just treaty? When, if ever, is it permissible to break a treaty?

In exploring the arguments for various answers to these questions, the talk tries to make clear some of the moral (rather than legal and political) legacies of the Treaty of Waitangi.

About the speaker

Simon Keller is a Professor in the School of History, Philosophy, Political Science & International Relations at Victoria University of Wellington.

Space is limited, so book your spot by emailing events.natlib@dia.govt.nz

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