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Memorials, names and ethical remembering

Date: Wednesday 15 July 2020, 12:10pm to 1:30am
Cost: Free event.
Contact details: ATLOutreach@dia.govt.nz
Part of the Public History Talk — 2020 series

How do we remember the past? What place do colonial memorials have in public spaces? How can we better represent diverse histories in the landscape? Though these debates are not new, the current climate provides an opportune moment for open dialogue about the place of statues, street names and monuments which commemorate New Zealand’s colonial era.

A facilitated conversation on colonial memorials, history and memory

Recent debate on colonial memorials in public spaces has occurred in response to the police killing of George Floyd in the United States of America and the major anti-racism protests around the world that followed.

Though these debates are not new, the current climate provides an opportune moment for open dialogue about the place of statues, street names and monuments which commemorate New Zealand’s colonial era.

As part of the 2020 series of Public History Talks, Manatū Taonga, Ministry for Culture and Heritage and Te Puna Mātauranga o Aotearoa, National Library of New Zealand, have convened a panel to discuss these issues and offer a facilitated conversation with the public on colonial memorials, history and memory.

Free public history talks

These free public history talks are a collaboration between the National Library of New Zealand and Taonga Ministry for Culture and Heritage. They are usually held on the first Wednesday of the month March to November.

Listen to this talk Memorials, names and ethical remembering

Talks in this series are recorded and available online

About the panel

Morrie Love (Te Atiawa ki te Upoko o te Ika a Mauī, Taranaki, Ngati Ruanui) is Director Raukura Consultants, a writer and historian. Morrie is also former Chair Wellington Tenths Trust and Waitangi Tribunal Director.

Nicki Karu Manager of iwi relations at Wellington City Council.

Ewan Morris (Pākehā) is a historian with an interest in public memory and cultural contestation over symbols. He writes about history and public memory at pastword.blog, and his publications include work on how history is used in place-name debates; memorials in Pākaitore/Moutoa Gardens, Whanganui; the Boulcott’s Farm memorial in Lower Hutt; and contested symbols and memorials in Ireland.

Joanna Kidman (Ngāti Maniapoto, Ngāti Raukawa, Ngāti Toa Rangatira) is Professor of Māori education at Victoria University. With historian, Vincent O’Malley, she is currently working on a Marsden Fund research He Taonga te Wareware? Remembering and Forgetting Difficult Histories in Aotearoa/New Zealand, a three-year study into how the nineteenth century New Zealand Wars have helped shape memory, identity and history.

Street signs in Wellington
Te Wharepouri / Waripori Street, Wellington. Image courtesy Dr Emma Jean Kelly.